Category Archives: work

ONE MOORE TIME

Ratatouille, day 2 — even better than ratatouille, day 1. (Full recipe here). Too bad there is no more ratatouille to see if it gets even better on day 3.

On a different note — I wrote a piece for Maisonneuve Magazine describing my favorite R. Stevie Moore video moments. I find his videos hysterical and it was a lot of fun to sift through all of his (bizarre) work. The piece was written in conjunction with an event I’m featured in on Friday, as part of POP Montreal’s Symposium series. I’ll be interviewing R. Stevie Moore at 3:30pm at the POP Headquarters — please come check it out! (Oh and finally, my friend Sean wrote a handy guide to POP Montreal for the overwhelmed. It’s enormously helpful. Check it.)

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STONED + CANNED

I was so stoked to organize a canning workshop with Montreal’s preserves queen Camilla Wynne, and I’m happy to report that the night was a mega success! (I’ve been eating her nectarine-sapote jam smeared on thick pieces of toast every morning for breakfast). We  can’t wait to get her back into the Dep’s kitchen for Round 2: Pickles. Stay tuned!

Lots more photos here. And here!

THROUGH THE DAY

Breakfast. If I could, I would eat smashed avocado and fleur de sel on toast every single morning. Feels right.

Lunch. Apparently I wasn’t tired of avocado on toast yet, because I added tomato, lettuce, smoked turkey, swiss cheese, and mustard, and had that for lunch, too. (I love eating the same thing in a row, many times over, until I either get sick of it or run out of it.)

And dinner. Pheasant breast wrapped in caul and stuffed with minced mushrooms, served with double smoked bacon, braised green beans, and baby potatoes and carrots roasted in bacon grease. It’s still pretty hot out, but I’m already craving cozy, warm meals, and this was perfectly rich and decadent.

Also, some housekeeping:

Voir recently interviewed me for a piece about the series of culinary workshops I’ve been curating at Le Pick Up. Read it here! (In French). Don’t forget — the next one is August 25!

And: Yesterday I joined forces with the estimable Venus collective over at CKUT. Um, it was so much fun, and it felt great to get back into radio after a few years of silence. I played songs by Noveller, Gang Gang Dance, Sade, and Grouper. Good times. Plus, I finally met Amber! Oh, and also? I was invited to curate the month of November for their popular ‘Montreal Sessions’ program. I’m so stoked!

And lastly: I interviewed Peter Gershon, my editor at Signal to Noise magazine, for a story in Foxy Digitalis. Read it here.

MONTREAL WORKSHOP! PRESERVING STONE FRUITS

And now… another Montreal-centric announcement!

I’m thrilled to announce the next workshop at Dépanneur le Pick Up
— and it’s coming right up!

Pastry chef and preserves expert extraordinaire Camilla Wynne will lead a workshop on Canning and Preserving Stone Fruits on Thursday, August 25 here at Le Pick Up.

Camilla is a professionally trained pastry chef who has been canning since 2002. She most recently worked at Laloux and Pastisserie Rhubarbe, but has also done stints at Les Chevres (RIP), Anise (RIP), and wd~50 (NYC). Formerly the baker behind Backroom Records and Pastries, she now sells jams, marmalades, jellies, pickles and other preserves under the Preservation Society moniker. (Adam and I love Camilla’s strawberry jam. Absolutely the best strawberry jam I’ve ever had!)

Camilla has been an amazing and inspiring presence in the Montreal food community (she made cupcakes before me at the Dep!), and we are so honored to have her host our next workshop.

At the workshop, Camilla will discuss the most important tenets of preserving fruits, including explanations of her own techniques, and an emphasis on basic safety. We will be making jams and preserved fruits in syrup, with a strong focus on seasonal stone fruits.

The workshop will begin promptly at 8pm. Each participant will have a hand in making their own preserves, with guidance and instruction from Camilla. The registration fee is $25. We are located at 7032 rue Waverly, and are a cozy and intimate space — so please register soon as there are a very limited number of spots! Cash only, please. To register, please email me at Natasha.pickowicz [at] gmail [dot] com.

Thanks and I hope to see you there!

YETI ELEVEN

Earlier this year I contributed my first piece to the journal Yeti, and the issue is out now. I wrote a piece about my friend Spencer Clark, and I’m stoked that my editor ended up using the title for the article that I suggested (usually my titles are so, so bad; it’s always the hardest part of the article writing, at least for me): “Your Own Personal Vibe Coach.”

I’m honored to be in the company of the other seriously awesome contributors, which include Liz Harris (of Grouper); Marcellus Hall and Olivia Wyatt. Montreal friends, the issue is available at Drawn & Quarterly. Other friends, you can order it online.

WORKSHOP! Radicalizing Herbalism and Activating the Healers

And now, for a Dépanneur Le Pick-Up-related missive, another workshop that I’ve organized….

Our friends Meghan Murphy and Claudia Abbott-Barish, two lovely California-based food and food justice activists, are traveling across North American in their cherry red 1980 Ford Courier pickup truck and touring bicycles… and making a stop in Montreal! They will be hosting the workshop “Radicalizing Herbalism and Activating the Healers” at the Dep on Sunday, August 14 at 6pm.

Both have been local food and food justice activists for many years and have come to look at their herbalism studies as another side of the same coin. Feeling a significant lack of social analysis and activism around herbal medicine as they have encountered it, they have been cultivating a common desire to radicalize herbalism, and mobilize healers to realize the innate activism in their pursuit of an alternative paradigm of healing.

Not to miss an opportunity for broad geographical and social engagement, the ladies have decided to fold their road trip, cycle trip and workshop tour into one jammed-packed adventure of intrigue, physical tests, emotional and psychological trials, community involvement and anarchist hedonism.

Here’s what they have to say about the Montreal workshop:

“Using popular education, our workshop will cover a brief history of corporate power and how herbal medicinal use has been prevented in the past, barring us from actions of self-sufficiency. We will focus on why cultivating, wild-crafting and teaching about herbs creates new possibilities for us to create more healthy, reciprocal systems (social and economic) in the rest of our lives. This analysis will include examples, past and present, of how people have used herbs and herbal medicine to resist exploitation by those in power. The workshop will end with a dialogue on how to engage around these issues with members of our communities; what methods are inclusive, representative and equitable, and how to collaborate with the most people.“

They’ll also be doing fun, hands-on activities like making salves, tinctures, and tea blends.Spots for registration are extremely limited, so please email me at natasha.pickowicz AT gmail.com for a spot. Unlike our other workshops, this event will be charged on a sliding scale of $10-20. Please pay an amount with which you feel comfortable.

This workshop is aimed at healers, herbalists or self-taught herbal-medicine makers, who are interested in how their work can have a greater community impact beyond the traditional forms of engagement. That said, it is open to ANYONE who is remotely intrigued by the subject matter. Your contribution is valuable no matter who you are.

For more information, please visit their website, Root Medicine. We hope to see you there!!

Jerk Chicken: It’s Not Just Heat

[All photos by Allen McInnis, courtesy of the Gazette] After alluding to it here, and after countless hours tinkering around in my kitchen and on my grill, I’m so stoked to finally share my story (and recipe!) on jerk chicken. I really wanted my jerk recipe to seem super approachable for the home chef, and it’s really as simple as spinning a marinade around in a blender, and exercising some patience while the meat barbecues super slowly and gently. The results are almost as good as anything I had in Jamaica, and I was thrilled with how it came out. I plan on making it all summer long!

Read the full story in today’s Montreal Gazette!

Also, wondering about my rad apron? It was designed by my dear friend Meredith Towsand. I love mine and wear it all the time.

And finally, thanks to Cheryl (whose blog I adore) for the wonderful mention in Simple Lovely Blog! What greater pleasure is there in the world than to inspire each other?