Category Archives: writers

ONE MOORE TIME

Ratatouille, day 2 — even better than ratatouille, day 1. (Full recipe here). Too bad there is no more ratatouille to see if it gets even better on day 3.

On a different note — I wrote a piece for Maisonneuve Magazine describing my favorite R. Stevie Moore video moments. I find his videos hysterical and it was a lot of fun to sift through all of his (bizarre) work. The piece was written in conjunction with an event I’m featured in on Friday, as part of POP Montreal’s Symposium series. I’ll be interviewing R. Stevie Moore at 3:30pm at the POP Headquarters — please come check it out! (Oh and finally, my friend Sean wrote a handy guide to POP Montreal for the overwhelmed. It’s enormously helpful. Check it.)

SEPTEMBER GIRLS

Phew, this week really escaped from me. Some nice things —

a stunning new exhibition by Liz Harris (aka Grouper) at Nationale in Portland (I love the hand imagery, of course)—

some mouthwatering photos taken at the Chez Panisse 40th Anniversary—

and an interview I did recently with Boston-based drone musician John Kolodij (aka High Aura’d) for Foxy Digitalis—

and the details for an event hosted by Maisonneuve Magazine, in which I interview the estimable R. Stevie Moore—

finally, I’ll be helping my friend Michelle serve up peach pastry at tomorrow’s Oysterfest in Old Montreal. I’m getting paid in oysters— the best kind of payment! Details here and I hope to see you there!

PIZZA, AND A NEW AGE MISTAKE

Fellow pizza freaks, I recently wrote a little write-up for Slice about the fantastic VPN pies at Pizzeria Libretto, a small restaurant in Toronto’s Little Portugal. In my own limited experience, it is, by far, the best pie I’ve eaten in Canada. (Miles better than anything we have in Montreal, that’s for sure.) I went to lunch alone while Adam was doing some research, and brought him my leftovers, neatly packaged by the restaurant in a cute bag. Needless to say, he was stoked when I surprised him with some cold pizza to snack on while we drove to Norman Hardie! Read the whole thing here.

Also, as we made our way through the city on our way to Prince Edward County, I noticed this Kay Gardner bridge and immediately thought of Kay Gardner, the awesome new age musician. I couldn’t believe that someone in Toronto would name a bridge after her! I thought it was the coolest thing that I had ever seen. Adam, however, thought I was crazy and that no one would do that. He was right. The bridge is named after some politician. Lame.

THROUGH THE DAY

Breakfast. If I could, I would eat smashed avocado and fleur de sel on toast every single morning. Feels right.

Lunch. Apparently I wasn’t tired of avocado on toast yet, because I added tomato, lettuce, smoked turkey, swiss cheese, and mustard, and had that for lunch, too. (I love eating the same thing in a row, many times over, until I either get sick of it or run out of it.)

And dinner. Pheasant breast wrapped in caul and stuffed with minced mushrooms, served with double smoked bacon, braised green beans, and baby potatoes and carrots roasted in bacon grease. It’s still pretty hot out, but I’m already craving cozy, warm meals, and this was perfectly rich and decadent.

Also, some housekeeping:

Voir recently interviewed me for a piece about the series of culinary workshops I’ve been curating at Le Pick Up. Read it here! (In French). Don’t forget — the next one is August 25!

And: Yesterday I joined forces with the estimable Venus collective over at CKUT. Um, it was so much fun, and it felt great to get back into radio after a few years of silence. I played songs by Noveller, Gang Gang Dance, Sade, and Grouper. Good times. Plus, I finally met Amber! Oh, and also? I was invited to curate the month of November for their popular ‘Montreal Sessions’ program. I’m so stoked!

And lastly: I interviewed Peter Gershon, my editor at Signal to Noise magazine, for a story in Foxy Digitalis. Read it here.

YETI ELEVEN

Earlier this year I contributed my first piece to the journal Yeti, and the issue is out now. I wrote a piece about my friend Spencer Clark, and I’m stoked that my editor ended up using the title for the article that I suggested (usually my titles are so, so bad; it’s always the hardest part of the article writing, at least for me): “Your Own Personal Vibe Coach.”

I’m honored to be in the company of the other seriously awesome contributors, which include Liz Harris (of Grouper); Marcellus Hall and Olivia Wyatt. Montreal friends, the issue is available at Drawn & Quarterly. Other friends, you can order it online.

Jerk Chicken: It’s Not Just Heat

[All photos by Allen McInnis, courtesy of the Gazette] After alluding to it here, and after countless hours tinkering around in my kitchen and on my grill, I’m so stoked to finally share my story (and recipe!) on jerk chicken. I really wanted my jerk recipe to seem super approachable for the home chef, and it’s really as simple as spinning a marinade around in a blender, and exercising some patience while the meat barbecues super slowly and gently. The results are almost as good as anything I had in Jamaica, and I was thrilled with how it came out. I plan on making it all summer long!

Read the full story in today’s Montreal Gazette!

Also, wondering about my rad apron? It was designed by my dear friend Meredith Towsand. I love mine and wear it all the time.

And finally, thanks to Cheryl (whose blog I adore) for the wonderful mention in Simple Lovely Blog! What greater pleasure is there in the world than to inspire each other?

WHOOPIE PIES, MORNING BUNS

Happy Independence Day to my American friends! There is perhaps no better wholesome, all-American holiday with which to share the news that you can now read my story about the wholesome, all-American baking and pastry community in Portland, Maine over at enRoute. We had the most tremendous time during our brief stay there earlier this year, and I’m already scheming ways to return. On Standard Baking Co:

Portland’s most renowned pastry shop, Standard Baking Co., is located under its sister restaurant, the James Beard-award-winner Fore Street, whose wood-fired kitchen can take much of the credit for Portland’s foodie reputation. Standard’s sweet wonders are inspired by old-world traditions: caramel-coloured pain au levain, impossibly tender croissants, spongy financiers and sumptuous morning buns swirled with caramel and nuts.

On Scratch Baking Co:

Some of Portland’s most heavenly baked offerings are found over the Casco Bay Bridge in South Portland. At Scratch Baking Co., unpretentious American desserts like graham crackers and shortbread studded with sea salt tumble forth from woven baskets. Scratch’s masterful blueberry scone is feather-light and tastes faintly of sweet cream. Its most popular item is an outrageously addictive, chewy-yet-crisp bagel, lovingly made with a nine-year-old sourdough named Lulu.

Click through the whole slideshow to read it all! I took so many more photos during our trip, and I’ll post more soon.